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Nasturtium may be grown from seed sown early indoors and transplanted outside after frost, or sown directly in the garden after frost, or grown from potted plants. Note: When sowing from seed, before sowing, gently rub the seed with a nail file to aid germination, as nasturtium has a hard seed coat. Sowing Seed Indoors:

  • Sow indoors 4-6 weeks before the last frost using a seed starting kit. It is best to use a large celled kit, or fiber pots as nasturtium roots are easily damaged when transplanting.
  • Sow seeds ½ inch deep in seed starting soil
  • Keep the soil moist at 70-75 degrees
  • Seedlings emerge in 10-14 days
  • As soon as seedlings emerge, provide plenty of light on a sunny windowsill or grow seedlings 3-4 inches beneath fluorescent plant lights turned on 16 hours per day, off for 8 hours at night. Raise the lights as the plants grow taller. Incandescent bulbs will not work for this process because they will get too hot. Most plants require a dark period to grow, do not leave lights on for 24 hours.

Sowing Directly in the Garden

  • Direct sow seeds in average soil in full sun after all danger of frost.
  • Prepare the bed by turning the soil under to a depth of 8 inches. Level with a rake to remove clumps of grass and stones.
  • Most plants respond well to soils amended with organic matter. Compost is a wonderful form of organic matter with a good balance of nutrients and an ideal pH level, it can be added to your planting area at any time. If compost is not available, top dress the soil after planting with 1-2 inches of organic mulch, which will begin to breakdown into compost. After the growing season, a soil test will indicate what soil amendments are needed for the following season.

Planting Potted Plants:

  • Select a location in full sun with moist, well drained organic soil.
  • Prepare the bed by turning the soil under to a depth of 8 inches. Level with a rake to remove clumps of grass and stones.
  • Most plants respond well to soils amended with organic matter. Compost is a wonderful form of organic matter with a good balance of nutrients and an ideal pH level, it can be added to your planting area at any time. If compost is not available, top dress the soil after planting with 1-2 inches of organic mulch, which will begin to breakdown into compost. After the growing season, a soil test will indicate what soil amendments are needed for the following season.
  • Dig a hole for each plant large enough to amply accommodate the root ball.
  • Set level with the surrounding soil. Fill with soil to the top of the root ball. Press soil down firmly with your hand leaving a slight depression around the plant to hold water.  Be careful to not disturb the roots as nasturtiums can resent being transplanted.
  • Water thoroughly, so that a puddle forms in the saucer you have created. This settles the plants in, drives out air pockets and results in good root-to-soil contact.
  • Use the plant tag as a location marker.